This Is Richard. There is something unusual about him that know one can recognise. Only he knows that he doesn’t belong here. Out of place, disturbed yet omnipresent. He is from another time, unable to know when or where he came.

Richard’s memory is fragmented. His motor functions soon return to him, not in a familiar way yet almost in a remote detachment. One thing prominent in his mind is that their future is over.  What he doesn’t know is from where and why he came. Was it a chance to prevent the fate of humanity, or an escape.  Informing the people of the twenty-first century about there downfall is an impossible task when his memory is disturbed, yet he knows their mistakes.

He sits near a man reading a newspaper, as always, there are stories of great injustice, misery, destruction, inhumanity, the man said, “i can’t believe this happens in this modern world, we are in the twenty-first century.” Richard stays quiet, realising that nothing much has changed over the century’s. The twenty-first century is still at war, the economy collapses every decade causing mass unemployment, the worlds poor increase, the environment is worse than it ever has been. One thing is that the the modern world is technological, now easily grasped by the western world . This is only the beginning. Yet Richard stays quiet.

A certain vision repeats in his mind. The vision is of a girl who he fails to recongise.  One certainty is that there souls are connected in a inseparable way.  She is embedded, imprisoned there without him knowing the reason.

No one listens or takes him seriously. The ignorance of humans is that of increasing plausible deniability.  He finds himself in a residential street where a woman is putting the rubbish out.  She looks concerned for him as his weariness is evermore clear. Richard  collapses in her arms.  He says he is from the future, she is not surprised or reactionary.  She asks him what the future is like, if there is flying cars, great skyscrapers, medical revolutions, technology beyond imagination. Or is there a polar opposite of rural simplicity with technology unseen yet functional.  Possibly even greater reinventions of the human body, her children traveling to the stars.  There will be wars, it seems inherent to humanity, corrupt politicians, rich and many poor.   Maybe we will be without war.  Alternatively we will be in total war, an Orwellian nightmare, some say it already has began, yet what nightmares can be dreamt when this situation already exists. Yet his answer is not to her pleasure. Richard only talks of the perpetual philosophy of what is humanity, though she must understand that mostly everything we do is for what happens next. He tells her she is already a time traveller the same as everyone else, moving forward, enable to manipulate the future.  He leaves the kind woman, as his state seems increasingly interrupted.

Richard’s state is changing, His reflection merges with another similar to his own. He feels his mind warping with memories and visions of unknown truth of fiction.  He is unaware of the condition of primitive time travel, where the journey to the past coincides with the merging of his inherent genetic code.  The physical body, and the flashes of thoughts and images, are from his ancestor.  With the physical presence of his ancestor, he is able to approach her.  Rachel is oblivious at first, though eventually feels uneasy.  Richard’s willingness to converge has failed.  She remains calm realising a maternal bond, as he explains the difficulty of his situation.  He states that the future we think of is like a bridge that has no real destination.  The construction is established by politicians, corporations, idealists, and of course yourself, they all become part of a future synergy where no one knows the future, or can really control it.  What are we without a future consciousness? What are we without anticipation, hope, planning, we are aimless, lost, deficient, and would not seem intelligent or evan human.

Richard has gained an objectiveness that few others can achieve.  In gaining this lack of subjection, he is disconnected and unable to be emotional.  The time traveler’s mind is unable to carry thoughts of what will be, only emotions.  Richard is tormented by his own memories, his ancestor’s and false perceptions. His mind is conceding to natures law against time travel.

To find some peace Richard needs a timeless place, where there can be no past, present or future.  The only place he is drawn to is the cave where nothing ever changes. It could be Plato’s Cave, or László Almásy Cave of Swimmers, undisturbed for thousands of years. Places that are eternal, undisturbed frozen spaces in time. Here Richard can delve deeper into his thoughts, attempting to extract significance.  Attempting to transform his mind i, where space and time collapse.

 

  • too heavy narration, may distract from the visual beauty of the images.

I have reduced the narration by cutting sentences off that don’t add to the effect, though i still feel that it is too heavy.

  • Quality of the stills is too much contrast for the moving image.

I have added contrast to the moving footage which blends better with stills.

  • Is it in tooo in the shadow of La Jetee? Ken commented that it is an update as the issues are contemporary to this time.
  • The ambient sound didn’t come through as i edited it in headphone.

I have adjusted the levels of the soundtrack and added more sound effects though i wanted them to be subtle not to distract from the visuals.

  • My narration gets tired towards end and needs tightening.

I have slowed down the narration towards the end and cut parts of to make it brighter.

  • the slow motion footage should maybe be part of a different theme or part to make better sense.

The comments provided where very interesting in providing different perspectives that weren’t apparent to me in creating this piece.

transcendent     Omega Point    horror

Synopsis:

(Adapted and homage to La Jetee)

A time traveller arrives in the twenty-first century to change the future, though his body and mind is disturbed by the experience, inevitably he is unable to communicate effectively.  He is haunted by memories of love, hate and horror of his ancestors as the result of time travel. With this psychological state depleting he finds refuge in a cave, where he’ll attempt to find some form of  contentment.

Brief:

The story will be narrated with the visual impact of b/w photography and moving image.  There will be a non-diegetic soundtrack and the length of the film will about 10 mins.  The story will incorporate theoretical and my personal perceptions concerning the future.

Full Story Narration:

This Is Richard. There is something unusual about him that know one can recognise. Only he knows that he doesn’t belong here. Out of place, disturbed yet omnipresent. He is from another time, unable to know when or where he came.

Richard’s memory is fragmented. His motor functions soon return to him, not in a familiar way yet almost in a remote detachment. One thing prominent in his mind is that their future is over.  What he doesn’t know is from where and why he came. Was it a chance to prevent the fate of humanity, or an escape.  Einsteins theory of general relativity where gravity is a result of time and space, seems disturbed by the event of a time traveller. Richard’s existence is disturbed. Informing the people of the twenty-first century about there downfall is an impossible task when his memory is disturbed, yet he knows the mistakes humanity is making to prevent what will become.

He sits near a man reading a newspaper, as always, there are stories of great injustice, misery, destruction, inhumanity, he said, “i can’t believe this happens in this modern world, we are in the twenty-first century.” Richard stays quiet, realising that nothing much has changed over the century’s. The twenty-first century is still at war, the economy collapses every decade causing mass unemployment, the worlds poor increase, the environment is worse than it ever has been. One thing is that the the modern world is technological, now easily grasped by the western world by the generation that has everything. This is only the beginning. Yet Richard stays quiet.

A certain vision repeats in his mind. The vision is of a girl who he fails to recongise.  One certainty is that there souls are connected in a inseparable way.  She is embedded, imprisoned there without him knowing the reason.  She is in the park, as he tries to get to her she disappears, he is unable to grasp her reality.

No one listens or takes him seriously. The ignorance of humans is that of increasing plausible deniability.  He finds himself in a residential street where a woman is putting the rubbish out.  She looks concerned for him as his weariness is evermore clear. Richard  collapses in her arms.  He says he is from the future, she is not surprised or reactionary.  She asks him what the future is like, if there is flying cars, great skyscrapers, medical revolutions, technology beyond imagination. Or is there a polar opposite of rural simplicity with technology unseen yet functional.  Possibly even greater reinventions of the human body, her children traveling to the stars.  Richard knows that some things are certain, there will be wars, it seems inherent to humanity, corrupt politicians, rich and many poor.  Maybe in the future the rich few will find a way to distribute wealth to the many that are hungry as they will come to some realisation.  Maybe we will be without war.  Alternatively we will be in total war, an Orwellian nightmare that becomes reality, some say it already has even by the twenty-first century, yet what nightmares can be dreamt when this situation already exists. Yet his answer is not to her pleasure. Richard only talks of the perpetual philosophy of what is humanity, though she must understand that mostly everything we do is for what happens next but does it enrich this present moment, or make things better? He tells her she is already a time traveller the same as everyone else, moving forward, enable to manipulate the future.  He leaves the kind woman, as his state seems increasingly interrupted.

Richard’s state is changing, His reflection merges with another similar to his own. He feels his mind warping with memories and visions of unknown truth of fiction.  He is unaware of the condition of primitive time travel, where the journey to the past coincides with the merging of his inherent genetic code.  The physical body, and the flashes of thoughts and images, are from his ancestor.  Richard’s image merges with that of his past relative with the memory of Rachel being prominent and determined. With the physical presence of his ancestor, he is able to approach her. In taking his image,  he inevitably becomes his ancestor, with his mind and persona.  Rachel is oblivious at first, though eventually feels uneasy.  Richard’s willingness to converge has failed.  She remains calm realising a maternal bond, as he explains the difficulty of his situation.  He states that the future we think of is like a bridge that has no real destination.  The construction is established by politicians, corporations, idealists, and of course yourself, they all become part of a future synergy where no one knows the future, or can really control it, yet will try.  What are we without a future consciousness? What are we without anticipation, hope, planning, we are aimless, lost, deficient, and would not seem intelligent or evan human.

Richard has gained an objectiveness that few others can achieve.  In gaining this lack of subjection, he is disconnected and unable to be emotional. No one knows the future, the time traveler’s mind is unable to carry thoughts of what will be, only emotions. It is impossible to remain in a time which is not your own, the human condition is too frail.  Richard is tormented by his own memories, his ancestor’s and false perceptions. His mind is conceding to natures law against time travel, or the experiment that has gone wrong.

To find some peace Richard needs a timeless place, where there can be no past, present or future.  The only place he is drawn to is the cave where nothing ever changes. It could be Plato’s Cave, or László Almásy Cave of Swimmers, undisturbed for thousands of years. Places that are eternal, undisturbed frozen spaces in time. Here Richard can delve deeper into his thoughts, attempting to extract significance.  Attempting to transform his mind into the autonomous vortex, where space and time collapse, so they can retrive him.

Omega Point is a term coined by the French Jesuit Pierre Teilhard de Chardin (1881–1955) to describe a maximum level of complexity and consciousness towards which the universe appears to be evolving.

In this theory, developed by Teilhard in The Future of Man (1950), the universe is constantly developing towards higher levels of material complexity and consciousness, a theory of evolution that Teilhard called the Law of Complexity/Consciousness. For Teilhard, the universe can only move in the direction of more complexity and consciousness if it is being drawn by a supreme point of complexity and consciousness. Thus Teilhard postulates the Omega Point as this supreme point of complexity and consciousness, which in his view is the actual cause for the universe to grow in complexity and consciousness. In other words, the Omega Point exists as supremely complex and conscious, transcendent and independent of the evolving universe. Teilhard argued that the Omega Point resembles the Christian Logos, namely Christ, who draws all things into himself, who in the words of the Nicene Creed, is “God from God”, “Light from Light”, “True God from true God,” and “through him all things were made.”

Five attributes of the Omega Point

Teilhard de Chardin‘s The Phenomenon of Man states that the Omega Point must possess the following five attributes. It is:

  • Already existing.
    • Only thus can the rise of the universe towards higher stages of consciousness be explained.
  • Personal – an intellectual being and not an abstract idea.
    • The increasing complexity of matter has not only led to higher forms of consciousness, but accordingly to more personalization, of which human beings are the highest attained form in the known universe. They are completely individualized, free centers of operation. It is in this way that man is said to be made in the image of God, who is the highest form of personality. Teilhard expressly stated that in the Omega Point, when the universe becomes One, human persons will not be suppressed, but super-personalized. Personality will be infinitely enriched. This is because the Omega Point unites creation, and the more it unites, the increasing complexity of the universe aids in higher levels of consciousness. Thus, as God creates, the universe evolves towards higher forms of complexity, consciousness, and finally with humans, personality, because God, who is drawing the universe towards Him, is a person.
  • Transcendent.
    • The Omega Point cannot be the result of the universe’s final complex stage of itself on consciousness. Instead, the Omega Point must exist even before the universe’s evolution, because the Omega Point is responsible for the rise of the universe towards more complexity, consciousness and personality. Which essentially means that the Omega Point is outside the framework in which the universe rises, because it is by the attraction of the Omega Point that the universe evolves towards Him.
  • Irreversible
    • That is attainable and imperative; it must happen and cannot be undone.

In 1971, John David Garcia expanded on Teilhard’s Omega Point idea. In particular, he stressed that even more than the increase of intelligence, the constant increase of ethics is essential for humankind to reach the Omega Point. He applied the term creativity to the combination of intelligence and ethics and announced that increasing creativity is the correct and proper goal of human life. He specifically rejected increasing happiness as a proper ultimate goal: when faced with a choice between increasingcreativity and increasing happiness, a person ought to choose creativity, he wrote. But the two are exclusively connected to where human kind is always finding creative ways to be happy.

Technological singularity

Some transhumanists argue that the accelerating technological progress inherent in the Law of Accelerating Returns will, in the relatively near future, lead to what Vernor Vinge called a technological singularity or “prediction wall.” These transhumanists believe we will soon enter a time in which we must eventually make the transition to a “runaway positive feedback loop”[citation needed] in high-level autonomous machine computation. A result will be that our technological and computational tools eventually completely surpass human capacities.[1] Some transhumanist writings refer to this moment as the Omega Point, paying homage to Teilhard’s prior use of the term. Other transhumanists, in particular Ray Kurzweil, refer to the technological singularity as simply “The Singularity”.

  • If we plan the future, will we do injustice to another future.
  • is it possible to predict the future based on passed knowledge and development.
  • Science-Fiction hijacks the future to extrapolate the present.  Its a prediction to tell us in the present not what to do.
  • Future perception is a political tool.
  • The second world war symbolised the end of the belief that technology benefits humanity, as it was used against us for destruction.
  • The ideology is that technology drives change, techno-determinaism is driven for a particular purpose.  People construct futures.
  • Technology has come to exist without the need for humanity, it will not need us to advance.
  • Humanity does not believe in boundaries, it is never content with what it has got.
  • Humanity is a abstract, there can never be a single humanity
  • Utopia is a screen for ideas, ideology.
  • History and the future are both linked by an attempt to make sense of what happened, or what will.
  • It is important that the future remains open, if it is not is forecloses change.

The films of Chris Marker are often termed ‘essayist’, participating in a phenomenological play with deep roots in French intellectualism. Working within documentary and pseudo-documentary modes, they mimic the manner in which memory and desire flash from cell to cell – randomly, instantaneously, elliptically.

La Jetée is perhaps the most ‘fictional’ of Marker’s output, weaving its story of a nuclear-devastated Paris in the near future; it is far from conventional. Lasting 29 minutes, shot in black and white and consisting almost entirely of still photographs – imaginatively blended with dissolves, wipes and fades – this is the bare bones of science fiction. It highlights why we are attracted to SF in the first place: not for bug-eyed aliens or galaxy-hopping spaceships, but for the way in which the form can twist our most cherished versions of reality inside out. Indeed, La Jetée belongs to a fascinating epoch in French alternative cinema, when a number of directors engaged with SF as a philosophical tool.

Rather, La Jetée’s virtue is its immediate, haunting ability to evoke the emotions of love and desire; its use of photomontage poignantly conjures up the frozen moments that constitute memory. As the man remembers his past, and the woman, he relives it – never really sure if he is sent or if he is dreaming – one snapshot literally coming alive with his subjective colouring. The familiar SF framework is merely a narrative hook by which Marker hangs this essay on Inner Space.

Our memories haunt us eternally, morphing and evolving through time so that we are constantly revisiting them, triggering them, repressing them; time-travelling to the past, so to speak, and projecting them into the future; confronting and modifying past, present, future versions of ourselves, family, lovers. This, then, is the subject matter of La Jetée, a minimalist masterpiece affording us an all-too-rare glimpse at the paradoxes and complexities of perception and the subconscious.

But an artificial exercise such as this can never do justice to the film. Finally, it must be experienced.

– Simon Sellars  http://www.ballardian.com/la-jetee

  • Stefan’s vox pop: Hero’s and Villains: you can judge a culture by looking at what they consider to be monsters, and who are the heros.

Nineteen Eighty-Four (sometimes written 1984) is a 1949 dystopian novel by George Orwell about the totalitarian regime of the Party. The novel depicts an oligarchical collectivist society where life in the Oceanian province of Airstrip One is a world of perpetual war, pervasive government surveillance, and incessant public mind control. The individual is always subordinated to the masses, and it is in part this philosophy which allows the Party to manipulate and control humanity. In the Ministry of Truth(Minitrue), protagonist Winston Smith is a civil servant responsible for perpetuating the Party’s propaganda by revisinghistorical records to render the Party omniscient and always correct, yet his meagre existence disillusions him to the point of seeking rebellion against Big Brother, eventually leading to his arrest, torture, and conversion.

Ministries of Oceania

In London, the Airstrip One capital city, Oceania’s four government ministries are in pyramids (300 metres high), the façades of which display the Party’s three slogans. The ministries’s names are antonymous doublethink to their true functions: “The Ministry of Peace concerns itself with war, the Ministry of Truth with lies, the Ministry of Love with torture and the Ministry of Plenty with starvation”. (Part II, Chapter IX — The Theory and Practice of Oligarchical Collectivism)

Ministry of Peace (Newspeak: Minipax)

Minipax reports Oceania’s perpetual war.

The primary aim of modern warfare (in accordance with the principles of doublethink, this aim is simultaneously recognized and not recognized by the directing brains of the Inner Party) is to use up the products of the machine without raising the general standard of living. Ever since the end of the nineteenth century, the problem of what to do with the surplus of consumption goods has been latent in industrial society. At present, when few human beings even have enough to eat, this problem is obviously not urgent, and it might not have become so, even if no artificial processes of destruction had been at work.

Ministry of Plenty (Newspeak: Miniplenty)

The Ministry of Plenty rations and controls food, goods, and domestic production; every fiscal quarter, the Miniplenty publishes false claims of having raised the standard of living, when it has, in fact, reduced rations, availability, and production. The Minitrue substantiates the Minplenty claims by revising historical records to report numbers supporting the current, “increased rations”.

Ministry of Truth (Newspeak: Minitrue)

The Ministry of Truth controls information: news, entertainment, education, and the arts. Winston Smith works in the Minitrue RecDep (Records Department), “rectifying” historical records to concord with Big Brother’s current pronouncements, thus everything the Party says is true.

Ministry of Love (Newspeak: Miniluv)

The Ministry of Love identifies, monitors, arrests, and converts real and imagined dissidents. In Winston’s experience, the dissident is beaten and tortured, then, when near-broken, is sent to Room 101 to face “the worst thing in the world” — until love for Big Brother and the Party replaces dissension.

Utopia (pronounced /juːˈtoʊpiə/) is a name for an ideal community or society, which is taken from Utopia, a book written in 1516 by Sir Thomas More describing a fictional island in the Atlantic Ocean, possessing a seemingly perfect sociopoliticolegal system.[1] The term has been used to describe both intentional communitiesthat attempted to create an ideal society, and fictional societies portrayed in literature. It has spawned other concepts, most prominently dystopia.

Politics & history

A global utopia of world peace is often seen as one of the possible endings of history. Within the localized political structures or spheres it presents, “polyculturalism” is the model-based adaptation of possible interactions between different cultures and identities in accordance with the principles of participatory society.[4]

Science and technology

Scientific and technological utopias are set in the future, when it is believed that advanced science and technology will allow utopian living standards; for example, the absence of death and suffering; changes in human nature and the human condition. Technology has affected the way humans have lived to such an extent that normal functions, like sleep, eating or even reproduction, have been replaced by artificial means. Other examples include a society where humans have struck a balance with technology and it is merely used to enhance the human living condition (e.g. Star Trek). In place of the static perfection of a utopia, libertarian transhumanists envision an “extropia“, an open, evolving society allowing individuals and voluntary groupings to form the institutions and social forms they prefer.

Opposing this optimism is the prediction that advanced science and technology will, through deliberate misuse or accident, cause environmental damage or even humanity’s extinction. Critics, such as Jacques Ellul and Timothy Mitchell advocateprecautions against the premature embrace of new technologies, raising questions on responsibility and freedom brought bydivision of labour. Authors such as John Zerzan and Derrick Jensen consider that modern technology is progressively depriving humans of their autonomy, and advocate the collapse of the industrial civilization, in favor of small-scale organization, as a necessary path to avoid the threat of technology on human freedom and sustainability. There are many examples of techno-dystopias portrayed in mainstream culture, such as the classics Brave New World andNineteen Eighty-Four, which have explored some of these topics.

Utopianism

In many cultures, societies, religions, and cosmogonies, there is some myth or memory of a distant past when humankind lived in a primitive and simple state, but at the same time one of perfect happiness and fulfillment. In those days, the various mythstell us, there was an instinctive harmony between man and nature. Men’s needs were few and their desires limited. Both were easily satisfied by the abundance provided by nature. Accordingly, there were no motives whatsoever for war or oppression. Nor was there any need for hard and painful work. Humans were simple and pious, and felt themselves close to the gods. According to one anthropological theory, hunter-gathers were the original affluent society. These mythical or religious archetypes are inscribed in all the cultures and resurge with special vitality when people are in difficult and critical times. However, the projection of the myth does not take place towards the remote past, but either towards the future or towards distant and fictional places, imagining that at some time of the future, at some point of the space or beyond the death must exist the possibility of living happily.

  • An old man is wondering in the park, he sits down, it could be any place, any time. Is there a decision to be made, an aspiration, a hope, a longing… a longing for a past where he was young, or a regret he never fulfilled.
  • Where do you see yourself?
  • Time is inescapable, the time traveller chases it on a lead of chastity, just as we all do, measuring it by its loss. If we could go back, or stop, it would take a lifetime to change things the way you wanted it to go.
  • On day I was sitting having lunch, next to me a woman was reading a newspaper, as always, there are stories of great injustice, misery, destruction, inhumanity, she said, “i can’t believe this happens in this modern world, we are in the twenty-first century.” I stayed quiet, realising that nothing much has changed over the century’s. We are still at war, the economy collapses every decade causing mass unemployment, the worlds poor increase, the environment is worse than it ever has been since the last species that was eradicated. I guess the modern world is technological, now easily grasped by the western world in the generation that has everything. Yet i stay quiet.
  • The worlds ends in a fraction of a second, choose the weapon, there are many to end the existence of humanity, discovering a world without you, without humans. If you where alone in the world,  seeing the trails of existence before you like a footprint in the sand, it gradually fades away yet you knew it was there.
  • Do you see a future of great skyscrapers, flying cars that network as high as the sky. Or a rural simple opposition to this, without the visual of technology. Will your children travel the stars , reinvent the human body.
  • what will humanity become, after humanity, what will you become after me, will others understand what is it to be human when we could never comprehend it ourselves.
  • to understand that mostly everything we do is for what happens next… does it help, will it enrich this present moment, or eventually make things better.
  • Some things are certain, there will be wars, it seems inherent to humanity, corrupt politicians, rich and many poor.  In the far future, for the first time in history, maybe we will be without war, we will learn a way to not persecute others. The rich few will find a way to distribute wealth to the many that are hungry as they realise, they don’t actually need it. Alternatively we will be in total war, an Orwellian nightmare that becomes reality, some say it already has, yet what nightmare can be dreamt when this situation exists.
  • Personally, i will be in love and lose it, in the physical or other forms it exists in. I will age, make mistakes, and learn.
  • The future we think of is like a bridge that has no real destination.  The construction is established by politicians, corporations, idealists, and of course myself, they all become part of a future synergy where no one knows the future, or can really control it, yet will try.  What are we without a future consciousness? Well, what are we without anticipation, hope, planning, we are as Lombardo says, aimless, lost, deficient, and would not seem intelligent or evan human.
  • What was the function of everything you’ve showed me, to help the realisation, to appreciate beauty, to understand horrors, what has this message resolved. Maybe its just a message of no real purpose other than to communicate. If i’m wrong i will attempt, to yield back the balance of my time.

Possible narration

  • “To myself I am only a child playing on the sea-shore, and diverting myself now and then finding a smoother pebble or a prettier shell than ordinary, whilst the great oceans of truth lay all undiscovered before me.”  Isacc Newton.
  • “Future consciousness is absolutely necessary for normal human life. Without the mental abilities of anticipation, hope, goal setting, and planning we would be aimless, lost, mentally deficient, passive, and reactive. We would not seem intelligent or even human.” Tom Lombardo
  • “the entire history of life on this planet could be convinced as a striving by life-forms to attain an ever-greater appreciation of the vectors of space and time.” Leonard Shlain.
  • “our aim is not merely to create aesthetically admirable fiction. We must achieve neither mere history, nor mere fiction, but myth. A true myth is one which, within the universe of a certain culture… expresses richly, and often perhaps tragically, the highest aspirations possible within a culture.” Olaf Stapledon.